Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Publishers’ Category

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

References
Steve Ignorant (with Matthew Worley)
Dimlo Productions: 2017.

 
Available direct from the Dimlo Etsy online shop.
 

If you ever wanted to know how / why or what inspired Steve to write his lyrics than this is the book for you.

In conversation with Matthew Worley (‘old’ punk, professor and author himself) Steve is talking about his lyrics and stories around them.

The book contains Steve’s lyrics and also features original lyrics, photographs and images from personal collection.

With a foreword from The Shend of the Cravats and blurb by Jason Williamson from Sleaford Mods. If you want to read every single word or just flick through this is a great book.

Self published under the name Dimlo Productions, 160 pages, landscape ‘soft’ cover 230mm x 155mm x 15mm book.

Read Full Post »

Mike Dines and Matt Worley (eds.). The Aesthetic of Anger: Anarcho-punk Politics and Music. Minor Compositions: Colchester / New York / Port Watson. ISBN 978-1-57027-318-6.

322 pages, 5.5 x 8.5
US: $25 / UK: £18 (one released, in print version, to book suppliers this autumn).

Available (in print) now direct from Minor Compositions for the special price of £10 (plus postage). The open access PDF can also be downloaded free of charge from Minor Compositions. (Please see below for more on the open access publishing model of Minor Compositions.) Official release to the book trade in Fall 2016.

Punk is one of the most fiercely debated post-war subcultures. Despite the attention surrounding the movement’s origins, analyses of punk have been drawn predominantly from a now well-trodden historical narrative. This simplification of punk’s histories erases its breadth and vibrancy, leaving out bands from Crass to The Subhumans who took the call for anarchy in the UK seriously.

Disillusioned by the commercialization of punk, the anarcho-punk scene fought against dependence on large record labels. Anarcho-punk re-ignited the punk ethos, including a return to an ‘anyone-can-do-it’ culture of music production and performance. Anarcho-punk encouraged focused political debate and self-organised subversive activities, from a heightened awareness to issues of personal freedom and animal rights to the development of local cooperatives where musicians, artists and like-minded people could meet.

The anarcho-punk movement helped to reignite a serious anarchist movement in the UK and inspired actions challenging the Thatcher-Reagan axis. The Aesthetic of our Anger explores the development of the anarcho-punk scene from the late 1970s, raising questions over the origins of the scene, its form, structure and cultural significance, examining how anarcho-punk moved away from using ‘anarchy’ as mere connotation and shock value towards an approach that served to make punk a threat again.

Contributors: George McKay, David Soloman, Russ Bestley, Ana Raposo, Helen Reddington, Rich Cross, Matt Grimes, Pete Webb, Michael Murphy, Alistair Gordon, Mike Dines, Pete Dale, Steve Ignorant, and The Free Association.

Minor Composition’s approach to the practice of open access electronic publishing is explained in the prelim pages of the book:

This book is open access. This work is not simply an electronic book; it is the open access version of a work that exists in a number of forms, the traditional printed form being one of them. All Minor Compositions publications are placed for free, in their entirety, on the web. This is because the free and autonomous sharing of knowledge and experiences is important, especially at a time when the restructuring and increased centralization of book distribution makes it difficult (and expensive) to distribute radical texts effectively. The free posting of these texts does not mean that the necessary energy and labor to produce them is no longer there. One can think of buying physical copies not as the purchase of commodities, but as a form of support or solidarity for an approach to knowledge production and engaged research (particularly when purchasing directly from the publisher).

The open access nature of this publication means that you can:

• read and store this document free of charge
• distribute it for personal use free of charge
• print sections of the work for personal use
• read or perform parts of the work in a context where no financial transactions take place

However, it is against the purposes of Minor Compositions open access approach to:

• gain financially from the work
• sell the work or seek monies in relation to the distribution of the work
• use the work in any commercial activity of any kind
• profit a third party indirectly via use or distribution of the work
• distribute in or through a commercial body (with the exception of academic usage within educational institutions)

The intent of Minor Compositions as a project is that any surpluses generated from the use of collectively produced literature are intended to return to further the development and production of further publications and writing: that which comes from the commons will be used to keep cultivating those commons. Omnia sunt communia!

Support Minor Compositions / Purchasing Books
The PDF you are reading is an electronic version of a physical book that can be purchased through booksellers (including online stores), through the normal book supply channels, or Minor Compositions directly. Please support this open access publication by requesting that your university or local library purchase a physical printed copy of this book, or by purchasing a copy yourself.

If you have any questions please contact the publisher: minorcompositions@gmail.com

Read Full Post »

Front and back cover of The Aesthetic of Our Anger - Anarcho-Punk, Politics and Music
Mike Dines and Matthew Worley (eds.). 2016. The Aesthetic of our Anger: Anarcho-punk, Politics and Music. Minor Compositions / Autonomedia: Williamsburg, Brooklyn.

COMING THIS AUTUMN, a new edited collection of essays on different aspects of the aesthetic, politics, culture and music of anarcho-punk:

Punk is one of the most fiercely debated post-war subcultures. Despite the attention surrounding the movement’s origins, analyses of punk have been drawn predominantly from a now well-trodden historical narrative. This simplification of punk’s histories erases its breadth and vibrancy, leaving out bands from Crass to The Subhumans who took the call for anarchy in the UK seriously.

Disillusioned by the commercialization of punk, the anarcho-punk scene fought against dependence on large record labels. Anarcho-punk re-ignited the punk ethos, including a return to an ‘anyone-can-do-it’ culture of music production and performance. Anarcho-punk encouraged focused political debate and self-organised subversive activities, from a heightened awareness to issues of personal freedom and animal rights to the development of local cooperatives where musicians, artists and like-minded people could meet.

The anarcho-punk movement helped to reignite a serious anarchist movement in the UK and inspired actions challenging the Thatcher-Reagan axis. The Aesthetic of our Anger explores the development of the anarcho-punk scene from the late 1970s, raising questions over the origins of the scene, its form, structure and cultural significance, examining how anarcho-punk moved away from using ‘anarchy’ as mere connotation and shock value towards an approach that served to make punk a threat again.

Contributors: George McKay, David Soloman, Russ Bestley, Ana Raposo, Helen Reddington, Rich Cross, Matt Grimes, Pete Webb, Michael Murphy, Alistair Gordon, Mike Dines, Pete Dale, Steve Ignorant, and The Free Association.

More information will be available from the Autonomedia site as the publication date nears.

Read Full Post »

All Around Was Darkness

Call for submissions:
Project title: And All Around Us Was Darkness…

Contributions are invited to a new companion title to the existing trilogy on participants’ experience of punk (Tales From the Punkside, Not Just Bits of Paper and Some of Us Scream, Some of Us Shout). This proposed new title And All Around Us Was Darkness… will again have a specific punk/anarcho-punk focus.

This time the editors are asking for chapters on various topics, rather than just music and gig flyers.

“Fiction” contributions should be heavily autobiographical in nature, and based on real events and real things [although names and situations can be changed to protect the innocent!].

The aim is to record the direct experience of punks in the words of punks. Chapters are invited on themes including (but not restricted to):

  • We would like to see chapters on stuff like
  • Fanzines
  • Communication and Soapy Stamps
  • Squatted Venues
  • Pamphleteers and Pamphlets
  • Design and printing posters and fly-posting tales
  • Hitchhiking tales
  • Fear of nuclear war
  • Setting up a record label
  • Animal Rights
  • Support for non anarcho causes like The Miners’ Strike
  • How Gigs Were Set Up
  • Direct action such as Stop the City, CND Demos, Huntsabbing, The Unilever Incident, and more
  • What it was like being in a lesser known band
  • What it was like being in a band/attending gigs at a very young age [under 12]
  • Female perspectives on any or all of the above would be especially welcomed

The intention to to shift the focus away from music, at least to an extent, to look instead at how anarcho-punk inspired people to actually do stuff, take direct action, form bands, squat venues, write fanzines…

The book will provide space for opinion and reflection and comment and what impact those times had on the people who were part of that punk culture; about what that impact has meant over time; and what the personal legacies of those times are for the people who lived through them.

If you’re interested in contributing something to And All Around Us Was Darkness, contact Greg Bull. There’s no deadline for submissions as yet.

Tales from the Punkside

Not Just Bits of Paper
Some of Us Scream, Some of Us Shout

Read Full Post »

Crass Reflections - Alistair Gordon

Alistair’s Gordon’s new book Crass Reflections on Punk: Capitalism, Culture & Ideology will be launched at The Art of Crass exhibition opening in Leicester in June.

Jointly published by Active Distribution and Itchy Monkey Press, Crass Reflections is a revised and extended version of Gordon’s Throwing the Punk Rock Baby Out with the Bath Water: Crass and Punk Rock a Critical Appraisal, originally published in 1996. That text had its own origins in Gordon’s undergraduate thesis.

Crass Reflections revisits, revises and extends the text of Throwing the Punk Rock Baby and comes with a lengthy new scene-setting introduction by Gordon. The book has been designed by Russ Bestley, and includes a Foreword by Crass’s Penny Rimbaud.

Ordering details will be available shortly after the book launch.

This book comprises an undergraduate monograph an essays written in the mid 1990s. The central theme sets up and critically examines the need to examine the work of the anarchist punk band Crass in light of a poverty of discussion of their activities in previous cultural studies writings on punk. Equally, notions of endpoints in underground cultures are put to the question. The broad thesis of the monograph interrogates links between critical theory and Frankfurt school perspectives on art and subversive culture and Neo Marxist accounts of their phylogeny. There is critical discussion of the tension and similarities between Crass and Neo Marxist accounts of the role of dominant ideology (traditional notions of false consciousness/media effect) in contrast to the cultural monopoly of survival needs as the central motor of social reproduction in capitalist culture. The monograph concludes with a discussion of the importance of the legacy of Crass and the need for future research. This monograph was written before the groundswell of punk scholarship in its wake and serves as vindication of its obscure and early importance. It’s principle importance lies in the fact that most accounts beyond this work have focussed not on critical theory but instead on historical contextual salience, aesthetic value and biographical detail.

This new edition comprises a new extensive introduction assessing methodological approaches in punk scholarship and examines the stormy DiY publication and contextual history of the original monograph. Moreover expanded versions of an original chapter is included in addition to essays on subversive culture, the 1982 Falklands conflict and an examination of philosophical approaches to repressive technologies.

Read Full Post »

Greg Bull and Mike Dines (eds.). 2016. ‘Some of Us Scream Some of Us Shout’: Myths, Folklore and Epic Tales of the Anarcho. (Itchy Monkey Press)

Available now from Active Distribution and Situation Press.

SOUS_coverSome of Us Scream, Some of Us Shout: Myths, Folklore and Epic Tales of the Anarcho is the second in the Tales From the Punkside series. Whereas the self-titled first volume encompassed the wider punk scene, Some of Us Scream… brings together the stories, the artwork and the inspiration of the anarcho-punk scene from the 1980s to the present day.

As with Tales… stimulus has come from the everyday, from those who were ‘there’ and from those who have personal accounts to convey. Too often a ‘scene’ such as anarcho-punk becomes defined by its canon, its key players. In this case, they are often (amongst others) Crass, Conflict, Rudimentary Peni, the Subhumans and Flux of Pink Indians (of which, ironically, the editors would like to thank for the title of this book). The editors do not wish to detract from their stories but merely add to them, to document those who were inspired by the music, those who (in their own ways) further contributed to the scene.”

Mike Dines (co-editor)

“A Gurt Lush book containing lots of great flyers, interesting memories, recollections, essays and personal opinions. Every anarcho-punk should own a copy. It’s a great companion read to Not Just Bits of Paper. Lovely.”

Greg Bull (co-editor)

Table of Contents

  • ‘The Name is Crass, Not Clash…’, Matthew Worley
  • ‘Red leb. Black leb. Sticky black’, Greg Bull
  • ‘Am I an Anarchist? A Tale of Anarcho Curiosity’, Russ Bestley
  • ‘Mindful Token Tantrums/Anarcho In Action’, Darren Johns
  • ‘From Crass to Thrash to Squeakers’, Otto Sompank
  • ‘Chumbawamba – A Retrospective’, Chris Butler
  • ‘Conflict!’, Chris Butler
  • ‘Fuck War’, Paul Davies
  • ‘Antisect Live Gig Review and In Darkness… Album Reviews’, Tony Drayton
  • ‘Antisect’, Caro Wallis
  • ‘Antisect: The Buck Stops Here’, Lance Hahn
  • ‘Antisect – Postal Interview for Unknown Fanzine’, Persons Unknown
  • ‘Antisect – Another Postal Interview’, Persons Unknown
  • ‘Hex’, Darren Pike
  • ‘On Tour With Crass’, Vincent Learoyd
  • ‘Punk Was Once An Answer’, Anth Palmer
  • ‘The Snatcher (Remix)’, Marcus Blakeston
  • ‘Gifts of the Garden’, Andrew J Wood
  • ‘Always Another Door’, Gerard Evans
  • ‘To End Up on Your Table…’, Alastair ‘Gords’ Gordon
  • ‘I Changed My World’, Stephen Spencer-Fleet
  • ‘The Nouveau Hippies’, Paul Platypus
  • ‘Publish And Be Damned’, Nick Hydra
  • ‘Why Do You Think That They Are Laughing?’, Rich Cross
  • ‘Well, Sir. I Might’, Willie Rissy
  • ‘Memories’, Tim Voss
  • ‘Tumbleweeds’, Ted Curtis
  • ‘The Squatting Year’, Gail Thibert
  • ‘Poetry’, Ruth Harvey Gasson
  • ‘The Last of the Mohawks’, Tom Lainer-Read
  • ‘Protest, Resist, Live: An Interview with SLUG’, Mike Dines
  • ‘How I Learnt To Love Grindcore…’, Matt Grimes
  • ‘A Haunting’, Lucy Robinson

 

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Available now from Active Distribution and Situation Press.
 
active_distribution

Situation Press

Read Full Post »

A new collection of reminiscences, recollections and stories from the first wave of anarcho-punk, co-edited by Greg Bull and Mickey ‘Penguin’, has just been published. As well as new and original written contributions, the collection features artwork, posters, handouts, flyers, tickets, lyric sheets and more besides from the 1980s wave of anarcho-punk.

Not Just Bits of Paper - front cover

Gregory Bull and Mickey ‘Penguin’ (eds.), Not Just Bits of Paper, Perdam Babylonis Nomen Publications, pp.36-41. ISBN-10: 1505703387; ISBN-13: 9781505703382

More details from the Not Just Bits of Paper Facebook page. There’s an online preview available with the listing on Amazon; and the book is also now available from Situation Press.

“We have our own words, scrawled on bits of paper smudged with some grimey hope. Angry chords waver out from the broken cassette-players – and every now and again a curious prisoner comes out for a look and never returns.” Tony Drayton.

A series of recollections, memories, imagined dreams perhaps from the collective memories of those who lived through the punk and anarcho-punk years. Tales recalled of times past and a glorious tribute to the bands and the crowds who made the 1980’s so special for so many of us.

Not Just Bits of Paper is available to buy online from Situation Press (the publishers of The Truth of Revolution, Brother).

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »

%d bloggers like this: