Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Gigs’ Category

CONFLICT PLAY THE Dolls House in Abertillery today (Friday 27 April) and the Exchange in Bristol tomorrow (Saturday 28 April).

Joining the bill in Abertillery are No Pulse, Brassick and Social Experiment; and in Bristol A Heads and Persecution.

Conflict - 27 April 2018
Conflict / No Pulse / Brassick / Social Experiment
Friday 27 April 2018
The Dolls House, Alma Street, Abertillery NP13 1QA
Details | Tickets

Conflict - 28 April 2018
Conflict / A Heads / Persecution
Saturday 28 April 2018
Exchange, 72-73 Old Market St, Bristol BS2 0EJ
Details | Tickets

Read Full Post »

ZOUNDS PLAY TWO gigs in Scotland this weekend, with a show in Glasgow on Friday 6 April followed by a gig in Dunfermline on Saturday 7 April.

Zounds - 6 April 2018

Zounds, Constant Fear, Ex
6 April 2018
Ivory Blacks, 56 Oswald Street, Glasgow G1 4PL
Advance tickets available online and on door.

Zounds - 7 April 2018

Zounds + Critikill + Iron System
7 April 2018
Woodstock Wellwood, Dunfermline
Advance tickets available online and on door.

Read Full Post »

CONFLICT FOLLOW UP on recent gigs in Birmingham (24 February) and Telford (3 March) with a live show at The Maze in Nottingham on Saturday 7 April 2018.

Conflict + Riot Squad + Terminal Rage + King of Pigs + Rats From A Sinking Ship
7 April 2018
The Maze, Nottingham
Doors: 19:30 | Tickets: £12.50 advance
“Can everyone attending this gig please bring a tin of food for Framework food bank”.

Conflict - Nottingham - 7 April 2018

Read Full Post »

Slice of Life - April 2018

SLICE OF LIFE play three live dates in succession in early April. The trio of gigs kicks off tonight at The Arts Centre in Colchester (5 April) and is followed by a live show in Brighton tomorrow (6 April) and a gig in Brussels on Saturday (7 April), supporting Sleaford Mods.

Slice of Life - Brighton - 6 April 2018

Read Full Post »

The Cravats - April 2018 - live dates

THE CRAVATS begin a three dates mini-tour-ette this evening (5 April), with a gig in Bristol at The Thunderbolt, with gigs in London (6 April) and Brighton (7 April) to follow, playing alongside Folk Devils

Overground Records are now accepting advance orders on the vinyl re-release of The Cravats’ debut single Gordon (backed by Situations Vacant). This repressing, limited to 500 copies comes with a special. insert. This seven-inch of aural loveliness was originally released in July 1978.
 
The Cravats - Gordon - re-release
 

Read Full Post »

Interrobang - Dunstan Bruce

INTERROBANG‽ RELEASE THE band’s self-titled debut album today, and kick off the album launch tour with the first date in Todmorden.

Interrobang‽ was formed in 2012 by ex-Chumbawamba members Dunstan Bruce and Harry Hamer and “former enfant terrible in the London louts, Regular Fries” Stephen Griffin. Their album is released in vinyl, digital download and CD formats. All The Mad Men Records sold out of all pre-release copies ahead of the release, but vinyl and CD copies will be available from the band on tour, and from many of the usual (and some unusual) outlets.

The eponymously entitled Interrobang‽ album is vocalist Bruce laid bare, torn open asunder, as he finds himself deep in those 50-something blues. Lyrically the album is an exploration of his determination to never give up the struggle despite his own malaise. He questions and rails against his own demise with song titles such as Curmudgeon, Mad As Hell and Am I Invisible Yet? whilst still full of that anger about the state of the world in songs such as Are You Ready People? and Here Now. He veers from the personal to the political, from the poignant to the pithy, never pulling any punches, always being brutally honest but with an ability to laugh at himself as well.

The music of Griffin and Hamer is short, sharp and urgent. Interrobang‽ pride themselves on their tightness and economy in these rapid-fire assaults and with their crisp, cutting backing vocals the band have created an album that is pointed and precise, exciting and exhilarating. This is an album’s worth of hard hitting songs for hard hit people with Griffin’s guitar technique building layers of scorching sonics which when seen live will astound.

The band are interviewed discussing the album and the tour in Soundsphere magazine and in Louder Than War magazine, and the album is reviewed on Louder Than War site, Punk Online, NARC Magazine, the Morning Star and elsewhere.

  • Friday 30 March TODMORDEN Golden Lion with Liines
  • Saturday 31 March WELLINGBOROUGH Horseshoe Inn with Eastfield. Wreckage
  • Sunday 1 April NEWPORT Le Pub with Eight Rounds Rapid, Emy Lou Robbins
  • Monday 2 April BRISTOL Louisiana with The Flux Capacitors
  • Tuesday 3 April LEEDS Brudenell with Bilge Pump, Year of Birds
  • Wednesday 4 April LANCASTER The Yorkshire House with Year of Birds
  • Thursday 5 April NEWCASTLE Cluny 2 with The Almighty Uprisers, Year of Birds
  • Friday 6 April NOTTINGHAM Maze with Headsticks, Verbal Warning
  • Saturday 7 April MIDDLESBROUGH Westgarth with Flies On You, Year of Birds
  • Sunday 8 April BIRMINGHAM Centrala with Eastfield, Alcohol Licks
  • Monday 9 April MANCHESTER Jimmys
  • Tuesday 10 April MILTON KEYNES Craufurd Arms with Louise Distras, Eight Rounds Rapid
  • Wednesday 11 April BRIGHTON Prince Albert with Dream Nails, Eight Rounds Rapid
  • Thursday 12 April LONDON The Islington with The Charlemagnes
  • Friday 13 April RAMSGATE Music Hall with Eight Rounds Rapid
  • Saturday 14 April SCUNTHORPE Café Indiependent with Eight Rounds Rapid, Addictive Philosophy

 

 
Interrobang tour dates 2018

Interrobang tour dates 2018

Read Full Post »

No Glue. No Glass Bottles - poster for 2017 retrospective exhibtion

In a guest post, Darren Pike reflects on the recent The Bunker 35 events, which celebrated thirty-five years of Sunderland’s acclaimed punk venue

 


“WHO’S YOUR LEADER? Which is your flock?” One of my favourite lyrics written by one of my favourite bands: Crass.

Crass were part of a movement which was spawned in the late 1970s and which gained popularity and notoriety into the early and mid-eighties. Anarcho-punk was a scene in which bands’ lyrics became extremely political and where serious anarchist ideas and ideals were expounded. Its DIY punk ethic saw like-minded people coming together forming collectives, bands, setting up record labels, writing fanzines and opening venues across the UK.

One such collective who “did it for themselves” were The Bunker group, who opened up a venue and activist centre in Sunderland. This September, members of the group arranged a celebration of 35 years of The Bunker at the “Pop Recs” coffee shop and art space (which was once part of the old Bunker). An exhibition and gig held over two nights (the line-up featured two bands that had played at the Bunker 30-odd years ago Anti-System and Andy T). Having attended one of the very first gigs at the old Green Terrace School (Conflict, Icons of Filth and Omega Tribe) and subsequently formed my own anarcho-punk band named Hex, I was intrigued and excited by the planned events.

As I pulled up in my car, I looked across the road and saw a large group of people standing outside Pop Recs, smiling, hugging each other and shaking hands. Faces I hadn’t seen in years mingled with people who weren’t even born 35 years ago. I was transported back in time and remembered my younger self chatting with mates while waiting to go into a gig, maybe to see Antisect or Flux of Pink Indians or one of the host of other bands which I saw play at The Bunker (or sometimes didn’t due to drinking far too much home brew).

Framed photographs of the original collective, of the venues, of people at the gigs and of the bands themselves had pride of place on the walls

The first thing that struck me was the sheer amount of people there. Once inside, you could barely move. I was really pleased with the amount of support shown. After chatting with mates and organisers, I had a look around the exhibition. Framed photographs of the original collective, of the venues, of people at the gigs and of the bands themselves had pride of place on the walls. A film made by the collective in the 1980s was also shown. Real DIY stuff, but great all the same. I then watched Jamie Harwood perform. He was excellent and very well received. After buying some merch, which consisted of high-quality reproduction posters and flyers, I said my goodbyes and was on my way and already looking forward to the gig the next evening.

The Bunker 35 - Prolefeed - Mr and Mrs Hardcore Photography
Prolefeed – The Bunker 35 – Mrs & Mrs Hardcore Photography

There were a lot of different faces in a large crowd for the gig the following night. After speaking to mates, it wasn’t long before Prolefeed came on and ripped the place apart. They are loud, aggressive, tight and on top form tonight. Each song lasts about 90 seconds. Barely giving you time to get your breath back before the next onslaught of rage and power is thrust into your face! Great stuff indeed.

Next up was Andy T. I first heard Andy on the Bullshit Detector compilation album back in the early 1980s. I still regard the song “Jazz on a Summer’s Day” as utter genius, and loved his debut single Weary of the Flesh. I’ve seen Andy T and band on a few occasions and thought tonight he was exceptional: spitting out poetry and songs from Life at Tether’s End and finishing off with “I Still Hate Thatcher”. Andy is still thought-provoking, original and relevant; a spoken word performer who’s up there with the genius that is John Cooper Clarke.

Let’s hope “the kids” get off their backsides and create some kind of worthwhile movement of their own

Finally, Anti-System take to the floor: a whole 32 years since they last played the Bunker! I remember buying their Defence of the Realm EP and loving it. This band have really gone through the mill, having members of the band imprisoned for various animal rights’ actions. They are a band who really do mean it. Confirmed by their recent mini album What Price is Freedom, they remain a band who are still angry, have something to say, and show no signs of slowing down. Starting off at such a ferocious pace, you think there was no way they could keep it up. Wrong! They were still blazing at the end of their set, and leave with the audience roaring for more.

And so the gig ends, and it’s off to the Museum Vaults with bands, punters and organisers for an after-show drink or three. This was a fantastic weekend, and I have to say the hard work put in by those involved certainly paid off. So, what now? Well let’s hope “the kids” get off their backsides and create some kind of worthwhile movement of their own, taking up the mantle themselves instead of leaving it to the old timers. But whatever happens next – here’s to The Bunker, and all who hunkered down, hung out, held the stage or hatched plans in her.

Darren Pike

The Bunker - Andy Hardcore and Raf Mulla

Andy Hardcore and Raf Mulla – The Bunker 35 – Mr & Mrs Hardcore Photography

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »

%d bloggers like this: