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Archive for the ‘Sources’ Category

On BBC One’s early evening magazine show The One Show yesterday evening (25 April 2018), Jon Culshaw presented a short retrospective feature on The Thatchergate Tape, the hoax telephone conversation between Thatcher and US president Reagan produced and circulated to the media by members of Crass in the aftermath of the Falklands War (recordings and transcripts of the tape are available online). There were no new revelations in the piece, but the feature includes a brief interview with Steve Ignorant and even briefer live footage of Crass (taken, as always, from the Persons Unknown documentary).

Viewers in the UK can catch-up with a recording of the show of the BBC iPlayer (until 25 May 2018).

Thatchergate - Culshaw

Thatchergate - Ignorant

Thatchergate - tape extract

Thatchergate - academic

Thatchergate - extract

Thatchergate - Crass

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Anarcho punk albums - the bands' story behind anarchist punk music -front cover

ANARCHO-PUNK IS an ideology of personal freedom. Its artistic self-expression should be available to everyone, regardless of technical ability. The message is far more important than the musical content itself.

During the late 70s and early 80s, many new bands emerged to expound serious anarchist ideas. They embraced the DIY punk ethos, creating zines to be distributed at gigs as well as a mine of information on their often gate folded record sleeves.

‘Anarcho-Punk Albums: The Band’s Story Behind Punk Music’ is a book that explores how some of the most controversial material ever written came to the forefront.

Over a year in the making, through a series of short interviews with band members, we delve into how the groups started, what were the primary political motivations and what they thought of the albums once recorded.

Interviews with Crass, Chumbawamba, Zounds, Omega Tribe, Subhumans, Blyth Power, Lost Cherrees, Antisect, Cravats, Icons of Filth, Rubella Ballet and Flux of Pink Indians reveal all we need to know about the defining LPs of the era.

A thoroughly engaging read, we find out about the growth of the squatting culture, the increasing interest shown by the Special Patrol Group (SPG) and MI5, how the albums were often outselling the mainstream pop acts of the time as well as numerous personal thoughts and opinions of fellow bands and individuals.

Punk rock recently celebrated 40 years since the Sex Pistols first burst onto the scene. However, for many of us, the Anarcho-Punk bands and their albums was when the real meaning of the movement came into its own.

Gary Miller. 2018. Anarcho punk albums: the band’s story behind anarchist punk music. Hedgehog Productions: punkonline.co.uk. ISBN 9781980274025.

Available in both print and Kindle eBook formats.

Anarcho punk albums - the bands' story behind anarchist punk music -back cover

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THE MIDLANDS PUNK Rock Video team took the opportunity of Conflict’s recent Derby gig to grab an interview with Colin Jerwood of Conflict

Colin Jerwood of anarcho punks Conflict took the time to speak with Shell after their set at Punks Against Cancer 5 in Derby, England on 15 July 2017. They discuss the aborted 2017 US tour, the current political climate and the New World Order, lineup changes and their set at Punk Rock Bowling in the US. All to the backdrop of Dragster playing onstage as Colin and Shell sat chatting backstage. Best watched in full HD!

Many more band interviews are available from the MPRV team, including recent meet-ups with Steve Ignorant and Icons of Filth amongst numerous others.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RLIR0u9T2ks

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A recent trip to Belfast has reminded me of this fantastic short(ish) film about Belfast’s legendary A Centre, produced by Dave Hyndman, which deserves the widest circulation and audience possible.
 

The A Centre or the Lost Tribe of Long Lane

November 1981: the A Centre was established as an alternative cultural space in Belfast city centre and ran on Saturday afternoons. Organised by the Belfast Anarchist Collective the centre soon became a magnet for young people and punks in particular. On loan from Belfast’s gay community, the Carpenter Club in Long Lane was transformed into a den of delight and subversion by exhibitions of numerous agitprop posters of the day. This was an experiment in mixed media: banned or controversial films, new wave music and punk bands, performance poets and artists, alternative books and comics, and a wholefood cafe being the weekly staple diet. The ever watchful RUC were continually perplexed at such a mixed gathering. This film is a record of just one of those Saturdays. Music featured from many of those bands who played at the Centre includes Stalag 17, The Defects, Xdreamists, Rudi, Spider, Rufrex, Dogmatic Element, The Outcasts, Just Destiny, Ten Past Seven.

Film produced by Dave Hyndman

You can find out more about punk in Northern Ireland from Spit Records including the publication on the definitive guide to Punk in Northern Ireland. Browse through over 100 photos from the A Centre on the Spit Records A Centre page.

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Penny Rimbaud reflects on the experience of his recent heart attack in a recent edition of BBC Radio 4’s Short Cuts (7 November 2016), which is available (in the UK) to stream and download through the BBC iPlayer. Host Josie Long also quotes from the lyrics of her favourite Crass song Big A, Little A.

Rimbaud’s appearance on the show is also available (as a ‘Radio Four in four’ clip) on the BBC Programmes‘ site.

Penny Rimbaud - Short Cuts

Why I found my heart attack a beautiful experience

Penny Rimbaud is a writer, philosopher and musician. He recently had a heart attack at Rochdale train station. He explains how confronting death was profoundly beautiful and liberating.

First broadcast on Short Cuts, 7 November 2016.

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Mike Dines and Matt Worley (eds.). The Aesthetic of Anger: Anarcho-punk Politics and Music. Minor Compositions: Colchester / New York / Port Watson. ISBN 978-1-57027-318-6.

322 pages, 5.5 x 8.5
US: $25 / UK: £18 (one released, in print version, to book suppliers this autumn).

Available (in print) now direct from Minor Compositions for the special price of £10 (plus postage). The open access PDF can also be downloaded free of charge from Minor Compositions. (Please see below for more on the open access publishing model of Minor Compositions.) Official release to the book trade in Fall 2016.

Punk is one of the most fiercely debated post-war subcultures. Despite the attention surrounding the movement’s origins, analyses of punk have been drawn predominantly from a now well-trodden historical narrative. This simplification of punk’s histories erases its breadth and vibrancy, leaving out bands from Crass to The Subhumans who took the call for anarchy in the UK seriously.

Disillusioned by the commercialization of punk, the anarcho-punk scene fought against dependence on large record labels. Anarcho-punk re-ignited the punk ethos, including a return to an ‘anyone-can-do-it’ culture of music production and performance. Anarcho-punk encouraged focused political debate and self-organised subversive activities, from a heightened awareness to issues of personal freedom and animal rights to the development of local cooperatives where musicians, artists and like-minded people could meet.

The anarcho-punk movement helped to reignite a serious anarchist movement in the UK and inspired actions challenging the Thatcher-Reagan axis. The Aesthetic of our Anger explores the development of the anarcho-punk scene from the late 1970s, raising questions over the origins of the scene, its form, structure and cultural significance, examining how anarcho-punk moved away from using ‘anarchy’ as mere connotation and shock value towards an approach that served to make punk a threat again.

Contributors: George McKay, David Soloman, Russ Bestley, Ana Raposo, Helen Reddington, Rich Cross, Matt Grimes, Pete Webb, Michael Murphy, Alistair Gordon, Mike Dines, Pete Dale, Steve Ignorant, and The Free Association.

Minor Composition’s approach to the practice of open access electronic publishing is explained in the prelim pages of the book:

This book is open access. This work is not simply an electronic book; it is the open access version of a work that exists in a number of forms, the traditional printed form being one of them. All Minor Compositions publications are placed for free, in their entirety, on the web. This is because the free and autonomous sharing of knowledge and experiences is important, especially at a time when the restructuring and increased centralization of book distribution makes it difficult (and expensive) to distribute radical texts effectively. The free posting of these texts does not mean that the necessary energy and labor to produce them is no longer there. One can think of buying physical copies not as the purchase of commodities, but as a form of support or solidarity for an approach to knowledge production and engaged research (particularly when purchasing directly from the publisher).

The open access nature of this publication means that you can:

• read and store this document free of charge
• distribute it for personal use free of charge
• print sections of the work for personal use
• read or perform parts of the work in a context where no financial transactions take place

However, it is against the purposes of Minor Compositions open access approach to:

• gain financially from the work
• sell the work or seek monies in relation to the distribution of the work
• use the work in any commercial activity of any kind
• profit a third party indirectly via use or distribution of the work
• distribute in or through a commercial body (with the exception of academic usage within educational institutions)

The intent of Minor Compositions as a project is that any surpluses generated from the use of collectively produced literature are intended to return to further the development and production of further publications and writing: that which comes from the commons will be used to keep cultivating those commons. Omnia sunt communia!

Support Minor Compositions / Purchasing Books
The PDF you are reading is an electronic version of a physical book that can be purchased through booksellers (including online stores), through the normal book supply channels, or Minor Compositions directly. Please support this open access publication by requesting that your university or local library purchase a physical printed copy of this book, or by purchasing a copy yourself.

If you have any questions please contact the publisher: minorcompositions@gmail.com

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As preparations for the upcoming “exhibition, gigs & talks celebrating seminal label & shop Small Wonder” continue apace, organisers have released a video clip from the BBC Oxford Roadshow featuring an ‘at home’ interview with Poison Girls from 1982.

“You have to start off by taking a grasp of yourself. The process that we’re all brought up in tends to murder the imagination and that’s a good place to start… reclaim your imagination and reclaim yourself” Vi Subversa

Oxford Roadshow visit Poison Girls (Vi Subversa, Richard Famous & Lance D’Boyle) and hear how they retain control of every element of the group from design, packaging and their live shows.

Poison Girls released “Piano Lessons/Closed shop” and the Hex EP on ‪#‎SmallWonderRecords‬ in 1979 (WEENY 3 & WEENY 4) in conjuction with their own label X-N-Trix Records.

The Small Wonder exhibition opens this September in Hoe Street, Walthamstow along with talks and gigs.
‪#‎PoisonGirls‬ ‪#‎Punk‬ ‪#‎RejectTheSystem‬ ‪#‎ViSubversa‬

 

Details of the events (scheduled to take place in September 2016) will be shared through the Small Wonder Records – exhibition, gig and talks Facebook page. The organisers are also keen for input from supporters of the label and the shop:

Have you got any Small Wonder memorabilia, posters, tickets, cuttings or records we could loan for the duration of the exhibition? We’d also like to hear your memories of visiting Small Wonder, Pete, Mari, Colin and the music they released and sold. The Small Wonder Records exhibition is part of Punk Waltham Forest – run and organised by Beatroots Creative.

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