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Platform Zero Presents Penny Rimbaud

Penny Rimbaud
What Passing Bells… The War Poems of Wilfred Owen
Music by Liam Noble and Kate Shortt
Visuals by Gee Vaucher
11 October 2018 | 20:00
Corsica Studios
Units 4/5, Elephant Road, London SE17 1LB
Tickets £12.00 advance

A NIGHT OF WORDS, MUSIC & VISUALS AT CORSICA STUDIOS

We are honoured to be able to announce that for our inaugural show, we have a performance by PENNY RIMBAUD.

Co-founder of the original Anarchist project CRASS, he is a musician, an activist, an artist, writer, a humanitarian and a philosopher, tackling subjects of injustice, exploitation, sexism and intolerance,and intent on promoting the notion of PEACE

As we approach 100 years since the end of “The Great War”, what better way to mark this crucial point in time than to join forces and acknowledge the effects of WAR and celebrate the end of one. Penny will be reciting – What Passing Bells… The War Poems of Wilfred Owen, Accompanied by Liam Noble on Piano Kate Shortt on Cello. Visuals to be provided by the outstanding Gee Vaucher in what promises, be a truly intense performance.

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Anarcho-punk art exhibition - Mexico - August 2018

THE EXHIBITION OF anarcho-punk art, which was previously displayed in Oakland, California in April of this year, is being shown in Mexico today, at the “punk rocking bar” Gato Calavera.

Exhibition of anarcho-punk art and photography with more than 50 pieces from 1983 to the present: rare photos of bands and activism, propaganda, fanzines, DIY, art, posters and more

Anarcho-punk art exhibition
31 August 2018
EL GATO CALAVERA
Av. Insurgentes sur N° 179 Col Roma 06700
Ciudad de México

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Steve Ignorant - Reading - 21 July 2018 - poster

Club Velocity presents
An evening with Steve Ignorant in conversation with Jonny Wah Wah
21 July 2018, 20:30
The Rising Sun Arts Centre, 30 Silver Street, Reading RG1 2ST
Seated show

The evening will start at 8.30pm (so please do not be late). It will be an in-depth conversation with Steve.Johnny will be asking questions about his upbringing, music that influenced him, life in Crass, everything inbetween and right up to what he is currently doing with Slice Of Life.

There will be sections where songs that influenced, mean a lot to Steve and along with some songs by the man himself, will be played over the PA as part of the evening. A Question and Answer section to finish the evening.

Steve Ignorant is a singer and artist. He co-founded the anarcho-punk band Crass with Penny Rimbaud in 1977.After Crass stopped performing in 1984, he has worked with other groups including Conflict, Schwartzeneggar, Stratford Mercenaries and Current 93 as well as being an occasional solo performer.He is also a sculptor, and has worked as a traditional Punch and Judy performer using the name Professor Ignorant.

On 24th and 25th November 2007 he performed Crass’s entire The Feeding of the 5000 live at Shepherds Bush Empire, in London, backed by guest musicians. In 2010 Ignorant announced plans to do a tour called “The Last Supper”, performing Crass songs from the period 1977-1982 with largely the same band that performed with him at Shepherd’s Bush, including Gizz Butt, Bob Butler and Spike Smith.[11] In August 2010 Ignorant and Rimbaud took to the stage together to be interviewed by John Robb on the literacy stage at the Rebellion Festival in Blackpool where they informed the large crowd that Rimbaud has now given him his blessing to perform Crass material live. On 19 November 2011, Ignorant performed “The Last Supper” at the Shepherd’s Bush Empire where he was joined on stage by Rimbaud and Eve Libertine This was the last time Crass songs were performed live by him.

In 2010 Southern Records published The Rest Is Propaganda, Ignorant’s autobiography co-written with Steve Pottinger

He moved to the Norfolk coast in 2007 where he volunteers as a lifeboatman.

In recent times he has been performing as the front person of Steve Ignorant’s Slice Of Life

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Soap the Stamps - book launch - gig poster

Nick Hydra
Rubella Ballet
Hagar the Womb
CTRL
Punk rock karaoke band
Shocks of Mighty
Sarah Pinks’ Gravediggers
Kathy Freeman

21 July 2018 (from 16:00)
The Victoria
451 Queensbridge Road, London E8 3AS
£10 on the door

Today is the official launch gig for Gail Thibert’s new book Soap the Stamps Jump the Tube. “Come early and purchase some fab grub (vegan and veggies options available) – grab one of the 100 free goody bags for early birds. Anyone attempting to blag their way in old school style will be awarded a pint of cider and a dog on a string (joking!)”

It’s 1983. Convent-educated teenager Gail dyes her hair blue and escapes suburban boredom in Surrey to live a more exciting life among the colourful punks and squatters of London.

Leaving behind the twitching net curtains and disapproving looks of beige Morden (A.K.A. Bore-don), Gail places a music paper advert to seek out likeminded ‘friends and weirdos,’ and so her adventure begins.

Along the way, Gail meets the good, the bad and the just plain crazy while riding the crest of the anarcho and post-punk wave of music which defined the early 80s underground.

Invited to join punk band the Lost Cherrees as keyboard player, Gail points out that she can’t play any instruments. When the band laugh and reassure her that they can’t play either, she takes the plunge. For two years, the band tours dive venues and releases cult records, and Gail combines the lifestyle of a punk musician with holding down jobs ranging from Camden Market stallholder, to sandwich making and cycle couriering.

Living in squats around the capital, Gail mixes with drug dealers and drunken casualties, at times living life dangerously close to the edge. Encounters with various lunatic personalities leave her nerves frazzled, and a horrific rape at a party leaves her scarred for life, yet she deals with it by campaigning for justice for rape victims.

As Thatcher’s 80s march on, boyfriends and marriage proposals come and go. Mike introduces Gail to motorbikes and before long she is zooming around on an old GT500 which she acquires through ‘cosmic ordering.’

She meets Bill the witch and learns the art of psychic protection and how to read tarot cards, which she finds she has a natural skill for. A new career as a psychic beckons, but although older and wiser, Gail finds she still has a knack for encountering the freaky and surreal.

Soap the Stamps is a true and sometimes harrowing story about a girl finding her way in a London that no longer exists.

Remembered with a sense of humour, Gail’s storytelling has an authenticity that that only an autobiography can provide and a memory for detail that will have you smiling and laughing.

Including snippets from Gail’s diaries you will recognize many musicians and personalities from the underground scene from that period and letters and fan mail that she lovingly kept all these years.

(And the title? A reference to ‘sticking it to authority’ and saving money by travelling on the London Underground without a ticket, and rubbing soap over stamps so the postmark can be removed and the stamps reused. Both popular punk pastimes!)

Gail Thibert. 2018. Soap the Stamps, Jump the Tube. Unbound Digital. ISBN: 9781912618187, 1912618184.
Official book web site | Buy online

https://unbound.com/books/soap-the-stamps/

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Anarcho-punk movement 1984 to present - one night only

Anarcho-punk movement, 1984 to the present
7 April 2018, 18:00-21:00 (one night only)

1-2-3-4 Go! Records
420 40th Street #5
Oakland, California CA 94608, USA
Tickets: Free, all-ages event
Details: Facebook event

THE 1-2-3-4 GO! Records store, in Oakland, California, plays host to a one-night special event on 7 April 2018, exploring the music, practice and culture of anarcho-punk from the early 1980s to the present day.

Anarcho Punk Exhibit from 1983 to present: rare photos, flyers, banners and DIY art show at 1-2-3-4 Go! Records in Oakland on 7 April 2018 from 6pm-9pm. Special one night only free event!

Covering: California, London, Peru and more..

Contributors: Robbie from A State of Mind, Tammy from Media Children, Greg Bull, Chris Low, Stig Miller from Amebix, Keith McHenry from Food Not Bombs, Ricardo PRocher, Ashley from Barefoot in the Kitchen, Orange County peace punks and more…

California: the anti-Ronald Reagan demonstrations, protests against nuclear weapons, freeing South Africa to end the apartheid demonstrations, animal rights and anti-vivisection rallies, benefit shows, radical feminist zines, late 80s’ black bloc, peace punks supporting gay and lesbian rallies in O.C., Food not Bombs (the 3rd chapter) to the 90s portraying an Animal Liberation Front (ALF) benefit show, political prisoner support, opening of the L.A. Anarchist Center, working with different movements (the Black Panther Party, Riot Grrrl), punks doing community outreach, organizing, and much much more..

As well there will be a special showing of a short film.

Silk screen posters and flyers - being prepared for the exhibition

The show promises:

  • Rare photos of bands and activism
  • Benefit show flyers
  • Art / posters
  • Fanzines / direct action and much more

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No Glue. No Glass Bottles - poster for 2017 retrospective exhibtion

In a guest post, Darren Pike reflects on the recent The Bunker 35 events, which celebrated thirty-five years of Sunderland’s acclaimed punk venue

 


“WHO’S YOUR LEADER? Which is your flock?” One of my favourite lyrics written by one of my favourite bands: Crass.

Crass were part of a movement which was spawned in the late 1970s and which gained popularity and notoriety into the early and mid-eighties. Anarcho-punk was a scene in which bands’ lyrics became extremely political and where serious anarchist ideas and ideals were expounded. Its DIY punk ethic saw like-minded people coming together forming collectives, bands, setting up record labels, writing fanzines and opening venues across the UK.

One such collective who “did it for themselves” were The Bunker group, who opened up a venue and activist centre in Sunderland. This September, members of the group arranged a celebration of 35 years of The Bunker at the “Pop Recs” coffee shop and art space (which was once part of the old Bunker). An exhibition and gig held over two nights (the line-up featured two bands that had played at the Bunker 30-odd years ago Anti-System and Andy T). Having attended one of the very first gigs at the old Green Terrace School (Conflict, Icons of Filth and Omega Tribe) and subsequently formed my own anarcho-punk band named Hex, I was intrigued and excited by the planned events.

As I pulled up in my car, I looked across the road and saw a large group of people standing outside Pop Recs, smiling, hugging each other and shaking hands. Faces I hadn’t seen in years mingled with people who weren’t even born 35 years ago. I was transported back in time and remembered my younger self chatting with mates while waiting to go into a gig, maybe to see Antisect or Flux of Pink Indians or one of the host of other bands which I saw play at The Bunker (or sometimes didn’t due to drinking far too much home brew).

Framed photographs of the original collective, of the venues, of people at the gigs and of the bands themselves had pride of place on the walls

The first thing that struck me was the sheer amount of people there. Once inside, you could barely move. I was really pleased with the amount of support shown. After chatting with mates and organisers, I had a look around the exhibition. Framed photographs of the original collective, of the venues, of people at the gigs and of the bands themselves had pride of place on the walls. A film made by the collective in the 1980s was also shown. Real DIY stuff, but great all the same. I then watched Jamie Harwood perform. He was excellent and very well received. After buying some merch, which consisted of high-quality reproduction posters and flyers, I said my goodbyes and was on my way and already looking forward to the gig the next evening.

The Bunker 35 - Prolefeed - Mr and Mrs Hardcore Photography
Prolefeed – The Bunker 35 – Mrs & Mrs Hardcore Photography

There were a lot of different faces in a large crowd for the gig the following night. After speaking to mates, it wasn’t long before Prolefeed came on and ripped the place apart. They are loud, aggressive, tight and on top form tonight. Each song lasts about 90 seconds. Barely giving you time to get your breath back before the next onslaught of rage and power is thrust into your face! Great stuff indeed.

Next up was Andy T. I first heard Andy on the Bullshit Detector compilation album back in the early 1980s. I still regard the song “Jazz on a Summer’s Day” as utter genius, and loved his debut single Weary of the Flesh. I’ve seen Andy T and band on a few occasions and thought tonight he was exceptional: spitting out poetry and songs from Life at Tether’s End and finishing off with “I Still Hate Thatcher”. Andy is still thought-provoking, original and relevant; a spoken word performer who’s up there with the genius that is John Cooper Clarke.

Let’s hope “the kids” get off their backsides and create some kind of worthwhile movement of their own

Finally, Anti-System take to the floor: a whole 32 years since they last played the Bunker! I remember buying their Defence of the Realm EP and loving it. This band have really gone through the mill, having members of the band imprisoned for various animal rights’ actions. They are a band who really do mean it. Confirmed by their recent mini album What Price is Freedom, they remain a band who are still angry, have something to say, and show no signs of slowing down. Starting off at such a ferocious pace, you think there was no way they could keep it up. Wrong! They were still blazing at the end of their set, and leave with the audience roaring for more.

And so the gig ends, and it’s off to the Museum Vaults with bands, punters and organisers for an after-show drink or three. This was a fantastic weekend, and I have to say the hard work put in by those involved certainly paid off. So, what now? Well let’s hope “the kids” get off their backsides and create some kind of worthwhile movement of their own, taking up the mantle themselves instead of leaving it to the old timers. But whatever happens next – here’s to The Bunker, and all who hunkered down, hung out, held the stage or hatched plans in her.

Darren Pike

The Bunker - Andy Hardcore and Raf Mulla

Andy Hardcore and Raf Mulla – The Bunker 35 – Mr & Mrs Hardcore Photography

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Penny Rimbaud - What Passing Bells

AHEAD OF THE release of Penny Rimbaud’s What Passing Bells, a reading of the war poems of Wilfred Owen set to an original musical soundtrack, on the One Little Indian label in November, Patrick Clarke of The Quietus discusses Rimbaud’s views on Owen’s poetry; the process of developing the studio recording; and his perspectives on politics and culture, both contemporary and historic.

In a new short documentary, Noisey invites Rimbaud to reflect further on the power of Owen’s words and the relationship between his own personal and political history and his musical and philosophical worldview.

Patrick Clarke. 2017. ‘Interview: Penny Rimbaud on Wilfred Owen’, The Quietus, 27 September. http://thequietus.com/articles/23279-penny-rimbaud-wilfred-owen-what-passing-bells-interview

 

Noisey. 2017. ‘Get Out of Your Own Way: Anarchy & Peace with Penny Rimbaud of Crass’

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