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Archive for the ‘Penny Rimbaud’ Category

Penny Rimbaud -Noisey - Vice
 

WITH THE RELEASE of What Passing Bells: The War Poems of Wilfred Owen, Penny Rimbaud discusses the project (and life, the universe and everything else) with Noisey’s Jamie Thomson. Of his work on the Wilfred Owen project he says:

I wouldn’t have done it if it was just a horror story. Because certainly, equally, his poetry is more powerful than any I know of describing the horror and the misery in the trenches, but at the same time there’s this sort of strange, deep love of the people who he was there with, which is the very love that he went back. I mean, he was hospitalised and actually could very easily not have gone back, but he did go back. He went back not because he believed in the war, but that he did believe in his men and loved his men.

Jamie Thomson. 2017. ‘War all the time: a conversation with Crass’ Penny Rimbaud’, Noisey, 10 November https://noisey.vice.com/en_uk/article/ne394x/a-conversation-with-crass-penny-rimbaud

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EXITSTENCIL PRESS ARE planning to republish all issues of International Anthem (the ‘nihilist newspaper for the living’ first produced by Gee Vaucher in 1977) in book format. Three issues were produced between 1977 and 1980.

In the pipeline – A publication that brings together the five International Anthems (published and unpublished) made between 1978-1982, into one book. This will hopefully be available towards the end of the year. International Anthem was created by Gee Vaucher as a vehicle for her own work and that of friends including, Eve Libertine, Penny Rimbaud, Dave King.

International Anthem - issue one

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Punk Lyrics with Murray Lachlan Young

PENNY RIMBAUD APPEARED ON BBC Radio 6 this weekend discussing the lyrics of punk with British poet Murray Lachlan Young and punk magazine editor Kirsty Allison.

The playlist featured a wide array of punk artists, and includes the Crass tracks ‘Punk is Dead’, ‘End Result’, ‘Fight War Not Wars’, ‘Bloody Revolutions’, ‘Yes Sir I Will’ [extract] Jeffrey Lewis’ cover version of ‘Where Next Columbus?’ and Penny Rimbaud, Kate Short and Liam Noble performing ‘Anthem For The Doomed Youth’ from the forthcoming What Passing Bells: The War Poems of Wilfred Owen

British poet Murray Lachlan Young takes a lyrical look at the world of punk.

He’s joined in the studio by Penny Rimbaud who co-founded the Anarcho-punk band Crass in 1977.

Punk poet, DIY club runner and punk magazine editor Kirsty Allison will also join in the discussion.

Punk lyrics with Murray Lachlan Young was first broadcast on 22 October, and in the UK is available on the BBC iPlayer until 21 November 2017.

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Penny Rimbaud - What Passing Bells

AHEAD OF THE release of Penny Rimbaud’s What Passing Bells, a reading of the war poems of Wilfred Owen set to an original musical soundtrack, on the One Little Indian label in November, Patrick Clarke of The Quietus discusses Rimbaud’s views on Owen’s poetry; the process of developing the studio recording; and his perspectives on politics and culture, both contemporary and historic.

In a new short documentary, Noisey invites Rimbaud to reflect further on the power of Owen’s words and the relationship between his own personal and political history and his musical and philosophical worldview.

Patrick Clarke. 2017. ‘Interview: Penny Rimbaud on Wilfred Owen’, The Quietus, 27 September. http://thequietus.com/articles/23279-penny-rimbaud-wilfred-owen-what-passing-bells-interview

 

Noisey. 2017. ‘Get Out of Your Own Way: Anarchy & Peace with Penny Rimbaud of Crass’

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IN THIS MONTH’S edition of Wire magazine, Penny Rimbaud is invited to identify and comment on a series of recordings from an ‘invisible jukebox’ compiled by Phil England.

Phil England [testing Penny Rimbaud]. 2017. ‘Invisible Jukebox’. Wire, No 404, October, pp.24-27.

Each month we play a musician or group a series of records which they are asked to comment on – with no prior knowledge of what they are about to hear. This month it’s the turn of Penny Rimbaud. Will the veteran anarchist find The Wire‘s mystery collection crass?

Rimbaud - Wire - October 2017

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CRASS ARE THE subject of the ‘Hello / Goodbye’ feature in the back-end of the November edition of Mojo magazine.

Roy Wilkinson [in conversation with Penny Rimbaud]. 2017. ‘Penny Rimbaud and Crass’, Mojo, November, p.138

CRASS FEATURE IN the one-page ‘Hello / Goodbye’ feature in the current issue of Mojo magazine. Based on an interview with Penny Rimbaud, Wilkinson compares how Rimbaud now describes his original expectations of forming Crass (‘Hello’, 1977) with his current reflections on the drivers of Crass’ endgame (‘Goodbye’, 1984).

Penny Rimbaud and Crass - Mojo - October 2017

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Crass - 'We don't want to be nuisance but' flyer

There is no authority but yourself… and there is no self

19 August 2017 | 19:00-22:00
The Substation, 45 Armenian Street, Singapore 179936
Facebook event
 

PUNK IS OFTEN NARRATED as a kind of year zero, a total break with the past. But this is far from the case. Nowhere is that clearer through the anarcho-punk punk Crass, who taking the phrase “there is no authority but yourself” made connections with a range of countercultures and arts, from the beats to the hippies, existentialism to surrealism.

Crass emerged from Dial House, an open house and arts space in rural Essex. Co-founder Penny Rimbaud describes its ethos creating a space where people “could get together to work and Live in a creative atmosphere rather than the stifling, inward looking environments in which we had all been brought up.” It is from here that innumerable projects and collaborations have been launched, from artistic ventures to political campaigns, from the planning of the first free festivals during the 1970s to the Stop the City protests.

This evening will explore these overlaps of punk, performance, radical arts and culture through a curator’s preview. Stevphen Shukaitis will introduce and provide context and background. This will be followed by an open conversation (via Skype) with Penny Rimbaud.Finally experimental musicians Dharma and Awk Wah will host a listening session accompanied with archival footage of the Stop the City demonstrations.

This event is part of The Substation’s Discipline the City series, part of which will revisit the Stop the City protests:

Stevphen Shukaitis is a Senior Research Associate in Art History at the University of Essex Centre for Curatorial Studies. Since 2005 he has worked with Autonomedia, a New York based publisher and autonomous zone for political arts and culture. Recently he co-curated Introspective, the first large scale exhibition of Gee Vaucher’s artwork spanning more than fifty years.

Penny Rimbaud didn’t go to Oxbridge. He is not married, has no children and no dog. He does not have a private dwelling in the Home Counties nor a pied-à-terre in Hoxton. He neither drives a car nor owns a mobile phone; his landline is inoperative. When asked, he says that he is a bread maker, this being because he realises that his bread is considerably easier to digest than his poetry and philosophy. He has been writing for all of his life, well, at least the last sixty-nine years of it. He is under no illusion that his writing days are not numbered.

Dharma was the guitarist of The Observatory for the first 7 albums. His initial experimentations with the electric guitar were with effects and later on incorporating objects together with various extended techniques. In 2013, he released his solo debut, Intergranular Space, which opened up new vistas for his guitar work. Since going solo in 2015 he has been involved in various experimental and improvised music performances most notably at the Asian Meeting Festival 2016 which featured notable Asian improvisers like Otomo Yoshihide and Jojo Hiroshige.

Awk Wah is the solo project of Shark Fung, a prolific Mandopop songwriter in his youth who later spent time playing drums in band like Engineered Beautiful Blood, Amino Acid Orchestra and I\D. Described by The Sound Projector as “a bound man sewed up in a mailsack trying to wriggle free with nothing more than a small nail file to make his escape,” Awk Wah doesn’t give you too much to cling on to before he has moved on to something else sound-wise.

Discipline the City

May 2017 – December 2017
The Substation, 45 Armenian Street, Singapore 179936

Cities mirror us. What happens when our city becomes over-designed and over-regulated? Is there still space for diversity, or does the city tend towards some vague notion of a model citizen? Who has the right to the city and who doesn’t?

Sometimes, control is heavy handed — police, barricades, closed circuit cameras — but more often than not, it happens in the invisible seams of its architecture. It’s the spikes in public spaces to discourage loiterers, the railings in void decks to stop kids from playing football, the hedges that grow outwards to prevent you sitting on the curb. We get so used to it that we don’t realise how little agency we have. Or we do, and we are helpless.

At The Substation, artists work alongside architects, designers, historians, urban planners to examine the precarity of urban life. The city, in its imperfection, even unruliness, offers multiple possibilities for those unwilling to accept this helplessness. It’s in the margins, the in-betweens, and the elusive public and civic spaces that we might find our individual and collective identity. That we might find ways to make the city ours.

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