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Archive for the ‘Slice of Life’ Category

Slice of Life, Manchester, 24 September 2016

 
Slice of Life, Tim Loud, and special guests
Kraak
11 Stevenson Square, Manchester M1 1DB
24 September 2016, doors 19:30
Advance tickets: £6.50 (plus booking fee), more OTD (capacity limited, please book early to ensure entry).

Legendary Crass frontman Steve Ignorant returns to Manchester for an intimate acoustic show at Kraak. Expect anecdotes and intense renditions of songs old and new.

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Slice of Life - Middlesbrough - 3 September 2016

Slice of Life
Johnny Campbell
Tim Holehouse

Westgarth Club, 99 Southfield Road, Middlesbrough TS1 3EZ
3 September 2016
PNMT £8.00 on-the-door
[See Facebook event]

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Steve Ignorant

Steve Ignorant appears as a guest on this morning’s (23 July 2016) Saturday Live show, on BBC Radio 4 (09:00-10:30); an edition broadcast live from the Pavilion Theatre at the end of Cromer Pier in Norfolk. The guest line-up includes:

Lesley Garrett, one of Britain’s most popular sopranos, actor and writer Charlie Higson who found fame with the Fast Show, the double bass playing beatboxer Bellatrix and Steve Ignorant, lead singer of seminal punk band Crass, who became a Norfolk lifeboat man and part time Punch and Judy performer.

The show is currently available (in the UK) to stream online from the BBC Radio iPlayer service: http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b07kldht

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SEAN CLARK CURATED the recent well-received The Art of Crass exhibition in Leicester, which developed to include a series of live performances and other events to complement the main exhibition. With the exhibition now completed and the artwork packed away and returned to its creators, The Hippies Now Wear Black invited Sean to reflect on the experience of putting together this distinctive exhibition of Crass creativity…

I’m sure it’s all been a bit of a whirlwind, but how do you feel that the exhibition went?

Well, I’m only now just starting to take stock! It went incredibly well though. There were over 200 people at the opening, both Penny’s and Steve’s show were sold out and there was a steady stream of people coming to the exhibition.

How has feedback been? What sort of things have visitors been saying?

Feedback has been universally positive. I’ve literally had people coming up to me in the street in Leicester saying thanks for putting it on. These have been people who were already Crass followers and, importantly, people new to the band and its members. We had a “feedback wall” up in the gallery and there were some great comments too. I photographed them all and will be putting them up on theartofcrass.uk soon.

Did you achieve the sort of visitor levels you hoped?

I genuinely didn’t know what to expect. I initially put the exhibition together because I wanted to see the work in a gallery setting myself and I through there would be some interest. As the project it grew – with new works being added, and then the gigs – I got the sense that it would do pretty well, but you never know. Interest on Facebook does not always translate to people coming to an exhibition.

Have you any sense of how many of the people visiting the exhibition were encountering the work of Crass for the first time?

I can’t be exact, but I think it was pretty much a 50/50 split. A big surprise for me was just how many Crass followers there are out there. People in council jobs, heads of arts organisations, people who run companies and many others have all told me about their own “Crass stories”. For people encountering the band for the first time I think it has been quite inspirational.

Penny Rimbaud in conversation at The Art of Crass exhibition

Penny Rimbaud in conversation at The Art of Crass exhibition

Did you have any criticism about filling the exhibition space with old punk stuff from the 1980s? Did anyone question the relevance of the material?

I was expecting some criticism and had come up with a few ideas for responses. However, I didn’t need them. I think when you look at the work in its entirety it is unquestionably interesting “art”. Even the copies of the flyers we put up were interesting. When you look at them individually you see might see a scruffy hand-made thing, but when you see 20-30 of them together you something beautiful. It gives you a unique insight in to the band.

I decided not to have any music by Crass playing in the gallery because I wanted people to take a fresh look at the art that emerged from this group of people

Have the events and performers been well supported too? Have you been pleased with how the performers made use of the context of the exhibition?

Without wanting to sound to gushing, all the performers were amazing! When it became clear that I would be able to put on both Penny, Eve and Louise (Cobblestones of Love) and Steve Ignorant and Slice of Life I wanted to make sure that there would also be opportunities for local performers to share the spotlight too. There is a performance night in Leicester called “Anerki” and I’ve been to a couple of their events. They have a really creative mix of poetry, music, performance, comedy, hip-hop and they provided a 45 minute support set for Cobblestones of Love and then curated 4 hours of performances on the final day of the exhibition on the 18th June. Then on the evening of the 18th we had local bands Jesuscarfish, Brassick Bears and Not My Good Arm playing before Steve and Slice of Life came on. Everyone was so generous with their time.

How simple or difficult was the selection process for the exhibition – you could have filled a space many times larger than the one you were working with?

I probably could have filled a space twice as big. Certainly if I had included books, records, photographs. “ephemera” and so on. I think, though, the size was about right and the artwork on display made for a very coherent exhibition. If I do it again elsewhere – which is on the cards – I’ll consider adding a bit more if space allows.

It’s clear that several former members of Crass have been extremely supportive of the exhibition; that must have been really gratifying!

I contacted Penny Rimbaud and Gee Vaucher first and they were very supportive. Penny then put me in touch with Eve Libertine who was similarly enthused. I emailed Steve Ignorant and, again, he was great and offered to do a Slice of Life gig. I also had a chance to meet Dave King (who designed the Crass symbol) and he generously added some work to the show. I got to meet Mick Duffield (who made videos for Crass performances) just before the show and he said it was fine to show his video work. I tried to contact Andy Palmer a couple of times, but he didn’t get back to me and I respect that. I’d have happily included work by Phil Free, Joy de Vivre and Pete Wright but couldn’t find a way of getting in touch.

Not all the ‘artistry’ or the artists of Crass were represented in the exhibition though (Andy Palmer’s paintings or Mick Duffield’s video work, for instance). Was that any sort of disappointment?

I did include some of Mick’s video work in the area outside of the gallery and would like to make it a more integrated part of the exhibition in the future. You’ll find links to his videos, and more Crass-related things on theartofcrass.uk website. I found Andy’s website on-line and think his paintings are excellent. I’d like to get one to put on my wall at home! I wouldn’t include anything in a post-Crass context without his permission of course.

Fight War Not Wars - The Art of Crass - Leicester - June 2016

Looking back, is there anything major that you would have done differently if you were starting the process afresh?

Nothing major. It would have been nice to have a longer gallery slot, two and a half weeks was not really long enough. But LCB Depot in Leicester gave me the slot they had for free, so I can’t complain!

Have you a favourite anecdote or story that came to your attention during the exhibition?

Well, having said that everything went really well, there was one negative in that we had a strongly worded “noise” complaint from a local resident about the show on the 18th June. I mustn’t be dismissive of it, but in the email the person said that, “the music (with screaming and screeching) is of a kind that 99% of population would consider extremely unpleasant”. It’s possibly the best review I’ve ever had!

Is the intention that the web site will continue indefinitely as an online resource? Will it continue to be developed or will it be maintained as a ‘fixed’ archive?

Definitely. I’m in the process of finishing off the website – with full documentation of the events. I plan to keep collecting Crass-related stuff when I come across it and will keep adding to the website. It would be great to combine it with other collections in the future and see it exhibited again in the future.

Is there any potential for the exhibition to go on tour around the country in future? Have you had any offers?

I’ve alluded to this a couple of times. Yes, I think a tour of some sort would be great. I would like to see it going to unusual places around the country – not just London and big cities. I’m up for offers from potential galleries, a couple of offers have come through already. I might see if I can get some Arts Council funding to cover the costs, otherwise it’s a case of “Do It Yourself” again.

if you want to understand what Crass was about then I think you need to look beyond the eight or so years the band was around for

Have you considered compiling a book out of the exhibition – artworks, plus history and commentary?

Perhaps a catalogue more than a book. But let’s see what happens. The artists deserve recognition both individually and collectively and there are some interesting stories in there that are perhaps not part of the accepted “Crass” and post-Crass history. Gee Vaucher is about to get a long-overdue retrospective in Colchester and I think she will come to be seen as one of the most significant artists to emerge in the UK in the latter 20th century. It would be interesting to see Penny’s writing and artwork presented as a “body of work”. Likewise with Eve and the other former members. In fact, you’re convincing me, perhaps a book would be a good idea!

What is your own personal take away from the event? What did you learn through curating and organising the exhibition (either about Crass or about curatorship)?

I think that the most important thing is that there is more to the people involved in Crass than being in Crass. All of the ex-members I have spoken to have done plenty of other things. In fact, if you want to understand what Crass was about then I think you need to look beyond the eight or so years the band was around for. I intentionally called the exhibition “The Art of Crass” because I thought this would be a good way to explore this idea, and at the last minute decided not to have any music by Crass playing in the gallery because I wanted people to take a fresh look at the art that emerged from this group of people. I think it worked.

Exhibition curator Sean Clark (second left) with Slice of Life

Exhibition curator Sean Clark (second left) with Slice of Life | photo: Simon Balaam

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Slice of Life have released a new eight track mini-album recorded live during a performance at The Forum in 2015. The vinyl version is limited to 300 copies; with a digital version available through iTunes.

Slice of Life - Live at The Forum

Having cut his punk teeth in Crass, Steve Ignorant’s latest project – Slice Of Life – allows for the more contemplative side of his song-writing to reveal itself. Like musical depictions of a British kitchen-sink drama, the songs provide vivid vignettes of the everyday. Both personal and universal, Slice of Life present ruminations from the bar stool honed on the late-night walk home. Musically, the band is built on an acoustic arrangement of piano, guitar and bass.

This album Live at the Forum 2015 will give a taste of that tour and will show that having shed the punk noise that defined Crass, Slice of Life retain the emotional impact and compassion that has long distinguished Steve’s work.

Live at the Forum 2015 is reviewed on the Louder Than War site; and the release is discussed on the Vive Le Rock site.

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Fight War Not Wars - The Art of Crass - Leicester - June 2016

Fight War, Not Wars – The Art of Crass

1-18 June 2016
LCB Depot Lightbox
31 Rutland St, Leicester LE1 1RE

Free entry to exhibition
[More details]

This exhibition includes records, posters, prints, videos, books and other items from Leicester-based digital artist Sean Clark’s collection of Crass-related materials, built up over almost 20 years. Thought-provoking, confrontational, angry and beautiful in equal measures, the art of Crass remains as important now as it was almost four decades ago.

Exhibition Opening

Wednesday 1 June 2016
18:00-22:00
LCB Depot Lightbox
Free entry
[More details | Book]

There will be a welcome by Sean Clark at 7pm followed by an introduction to Crass by Alastair Gordon from De Montfort University and a short talk by Stevphen Shukaitis about the Gee Vaucher retrospective happening in Colchester in November.

Penny Rimbaud and Louise Elliot

Yes Sir, I Will
Friday 10 June 2016
LCB Depot Lightbox
Entry £10.00 (including booklet)
[More details | Book]

Penny Rimbaud (vocals, ex-Crass) and Louise Elliot (saxophone) present a lyrical re-working of Crass’ seminal anti-war album Yes Sir, I Will. The show will take place in the gallery and be include video projections. This is a very rare opportunity to see this work performed live. It is also the main fundraising event for The Art of Crass exhibition. Support will be provided by Leicester’s Music, Live Art, Spoken Word and Film night Anerki.

Exhibition open from 18:00, Anerki at 20:00, Penny Rimbaud and Louise Elliot at 21:00, the exhibition will remain open until 23:00.

DIY + Steve Ignorant’s Slice of Life

Saturday 18 June 2016
12noon-23:00
LCB Depot
Free entry to daytime event
Evening gig: £8.00
[More details | book]

Punk may have been 40 years ago, but the “do it yourself” attitude it promoted is as relevant now as it ever was. To mark the end of “Fight War Not Wars: The Art Of Crass” exhibition we will be holding an all-day and evening event of self-organised creativity of all kinds. More details will be released soon, so keep the day clear. If you are interested in contributing please post on the Facebook Page or email theartofcrass@interactdigitalarts.uk.

To finish off the Art of Crass exhibition we have Crass co-founder Steve Ignorant’s latest band – Slice of Life. This is a real treat!

Having cut his punk teeth in Crass, Steve Ignorant’s latest project – Slice Of Life – allows for the more contemplative side of his song-writing to reveal itself. Like musical depictions of a British kitchen-sink drama, the songs on the debut album Love and a Lamp-post (Overground Records, 2014) provide vivid vignettes of the everyday. Both personal and universal, Slice of Life present ruminations from the bar stool honed on the late-night walk home. Musically, the band is built on an acoustic arrangement of piano, guitar and bass. Having shed the punk noise that defined Crass, Slice of Life retain the emotional impact and compassion that has long distinguished Steve’s work.

Fight War, Not Wars: The Art of Crass: http://www.theartofcrass.uk

UPDATED, 26 April 2016: New version of the poster added.

UPDATED, 8 May 2016: Third and final version of the poster added.

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Slice of Life - Your Day Will Come

UPDATE, 10 April 2016: As part of this year’s Record Store Day, Steve Ignorant is appearing the Voxbox Music store, 21 St. Stephen Street, Edinburgh EH3 5AN on 16 April (the day of the Edinburgh Slice of Life gig). He will be interviewed by Olaf Furniss, and will be available for a signing session following the Q&A. More details from the Voxbox site.

STEVE IGNORANT (CRASS)
Steve joins us during his UK tour for an interview and Q&A about his life in anarcho-punk legends, Crass. He’ll also be signing records and copies of his book, The Rest is Propaganda.

 

Slice of Life - Edinburgh - 16 April 2016

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