Penny Rimbaud and Gee Vaucher appear at the Leeds Recon Festival 2013 at 19:30 at 4 September 2013 at the Brudenell Social Club, 33 Queen’s Road, Leeds LS6 1NY. Tickets are available online and more details can be found on the event’s Facebook listing.

PENNY RIMBAUD (UK, Crass)

Jeremy John Ratter (born 8 June 1943, South West London, England) is better known as Penny (Lapsang) Rimbaud. He is a writer, poet, philosopher, painter, musician and activist. He was a former member of the performance art groups EXIT and Ceres Confusion, and in 1972 was co-founder with Phil Russell aka Wally Hope of the Stonehenge Free Festivals. In 1977, alongside Steve Ignorant, he co-founded the seminal anarchist punk band Crass which disbanded in 1984. From that time up until 2000 he devoted himself almost entirely to writing, returning to the public platform in 2001 as a performance poet working alongside Australian saxophonist Louise Elliott and a wide variety of jazz musicians under the umbrella of Penny Rimbaud’s Last Amendment.

GEE VAUCHER

Gee Vaucher is a visual artist who was born in 1945 in Dagenham, East London.

Her work with Anarcho-punk band Crass was seminal to the ‘protest art’ of the 1980s. Vaucher has always seen her work as a tool for social change. In her collection of early works (1960-1997) Crass Art and Other Pre Post-Modernist Monsters, Vaucher can be seen to have expressed her strong anarcho-pacifist and feminist views in her paintings and collage. Vaucher also uses surrealist styles and methods.

In Vaucher’s second book, Animal Rites, she gives a commentary on the relationship between animals and humans, centered on the quote ” All humans are animal, but some animals are more human than others.”

In the foreword to her 1999 retrospective collection Crass Art and Other Pre Post-Modernist Monsters, Ian Dury writes: “In its original form, Gee’s work is intricate and tactile, and while the imagery is sometimes almost overwhelming, the primary concerns are those of a painter; dealing with form and space. Mere newsprint would hardly do justice to its subtle tones. When the work is printed, the space becomes more simple and the graphic images take on a different life. The concerns are those of delivery, and the message is clear.”