A retrospective piece, by the author of this blog, following the decision by the Freedom bookshop collective to cease print production of the anarchist newspaper (first published in 1886) and go ‘electronic only’.

Freedom occupies a special place in my anarchist heart, because it was the first anarchist newspaper that I ever picked up, in 1980 at the age of 17 […] As I read those first few issues back then, a lot of the paper’s frame of reference was pretty alien to me. The lyrics and wraparound essays of a Poison Girls or Crass twelve-inch record had more immediate anarchist resonance for me, than much of what appeared to be (from my teenage punk perspective) the frequently strange and arcane political and cultural preoccupations of Freedom‘s writers. […]

But there was no doubting my affinity with the sentiments and aspirations which I saw motivating the paper. As I also discovered Black Flag, Xtra! and Anarchy, the range of the expanding anarchist press seemed (alongside the stacks of punk fanzines piling up in my room) to be an even more encouraging sign. The anarchist movement appeared to be multiplying.

Freedom front cover, 29 May 1982
Freedom front cover, 29 May 1982

Rich Cross. 2014. ‘What Does Moving Online Mean For Freedom?‘, Freedom [online], 2 April, http://www.freedompress.org.uk/news/2014/04/02/what-does-moving-online-mean-for-freedom/